Category: Microphones

Condenser Microphone

Condenser microphones are devices that have high-impedance and require that the amplification is located near the sensor itself. The dynamic range of condenser microphones is usually limited by an amplifier. Condenser microphones are typically made of stainless steel and other similar metals. These types of microphones are steady at varying temperatures and environmental changes. Condenser…
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Dynamic Microphone

Through the process of electromagnetism, dynamic microphones are able to convert sound into electrical signals. The assembly of a dynamic microphone is simple and quite similar to the structure of a loudspeaker. It’s worth mentioning that the construction of a dynamic microphone is light and delicate, and it responds to low pressure levels. Also, dynamic…
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Ribbon Microphone

The first ribbon microphone that became commercially available revolutionized the audio recording and broadcasting industries. This microphone was known as RCA Photophone Type PB-31. Soon after this microphone was launched, the BBC-Marconi Type A microphone appeared. It’s worth mentioning that the ribbon microphone and the ribbon speaker were created around the same time. The ribbon…
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USB Microphone

A USB microphone is a new category within the microphone universe that is designed to interface perfectly with a computer using only a digital connection. USB microphones are different from conventional microphones because they join both preamplification and digitalization stages into one single unit. These types of microphones also include a sensor component within the…
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Stereo Microphone

Stereo microphones use a specific technique that involves a combination of two microphone capsules into a single housing for conventional stereo recordings. The most common types of microphones that are frequently used for combination are condenser microphones, dynamic microphones and ribbon microphones.  Stereo miking has been a widely used technique since it uses a combination…
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Ceramic Microphones

Ceramic microphones are a new version of crystal microphones that are much more stable and widely shock-resistant, especially when compared to electromagnetic microphones. The operation of these types of microphones is fairly simple as it is based on a sound that can move a diaphragm which is connected to a piezoelectric material by a bar…
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Carbon Microphones

Carbon microphones are devices with high output levels, low impedance and tend to be pretty affordable. On the contrary, carbon microphones have a limited frequency response. As dynamic microphones and condenser microphones became more affordable, carbon microphones lost their popularity. It’s worth mentioning that he first carbon microphone was patented by Thomas Edison in 1876,…
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Fiber Optic Microphones

Fiber-optic microphones are EMI/RFI immune. Fiber-optic mics are not impacted by and do not react to electrical, magnetic, electrostatic, or radioactive fields. Therefore, their design is ideal for settings where the use of traditional microphones is dangerous or ineffective. These scenarios include places like industrial turbines and MRI equipment setups. Fiber-optic microphones tend to be…
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Electret Microphones

Electret materials have been known for a long time and were proposed as an important component for condenser microphones. Nevertheless, they seemed impractical before the foil electret that was created. This material involved a thin metalized Teflon foil and quickly became the most used material for applications that had a high-quality recording and a lavalier…
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Laser Microphones

A laser microphone is a device which detects sound vibrations in a distant object. Since laser microphones can be used to eavesdrop with a minimal chance of exposure, they are commonly used within the surveillance industry. These microphones originated with the idea of eliminating distortion from old-style microphones. Laser microphones are still in an experimental…
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